This week’s lessons 6

This was a productive week. It also helps that I have some more free time available and have finally finished my series on RE development! The link is here https://mihaslekovec.com/2019/11/14/6-components-of-project-development/

A travel into the past. The Schwabylon project in Munich was planned as a shopping centre with spas, hotels, etc.j and a three-floor-disco, with a 600.000 m3 pool, with 30 sharks in it! It was opened in 1973, but was so outrageous, that it closed a few years later. The building was almost completely windowless. Parts of it still remain and are active to this day. http://www.voicesofeastanglia.com/2013/03/the-planners-dream-went-wrong-schwabylon.html

Then there was this article about the dwellings issue in Berlin. It looks on the supply side and argues, that the problem lays in the hand of landowners, who do not want to develop the empty plots. I would agree with it, but this is not the only reason. It is a mosaic of issues. https://www.rbb24.de/politik/beitrag/2019/09/berlin-grundstueckspreise-bodenpreisdeckel.html

Andrew Wheeler present the current state of 3D printing and argues that the technology is overhyped. Probably yes, but I still believe there are niches, where 3D printing is overperforming traditional methods. Scaffolding is one of them (3D printing the scaffolding on site, putting the rebars in, filling with concrete). https://www.engineering.com/3DPrinting/3DPrintingArticles/ArticleID/19722/3D-Printing-in-Construction-More-than-Overhyped-Promises-and-Underwhelming-D

David Graeber hits again with this article in NY Review of books. He points out, again, that the mainstream economics has deep problems, as their deepest fears (ex. inflation, even though we are printing tons of money), are not happening. But contrary, they are hurting the real world. https://www.nybooks.com/articles/2019/12/05/against-economics/

I saw this cute tweet showing the density of transportation with different vehicles. It is self-evident that the cars are the worst.

<blockquote class=”twitter-tweet”><p lang=”fr” dir=”ltr”>On transportation efficiency in cities.<a href=”https://t.co/4FUc9zebzr”>pic.twitter.com/4FUc9zebzr</a&gt; via <a href=”https://twitter.com/NACTO?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw”>@NACTO</a&gt; <a href=”https://twitter.com/BrentToderian?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw”>@BrentToderian</a></p>&mdash; Urban Planning &amp; Mobility (@urbanthoughts11) <a href=”https://twitter.com/urbanthoughts11/status/1194701951813984259?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw”>November 13, 2019</a></blockquote> <script async src=”https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js&#8221; charset=”utf-8″></script>

Thought of the week. The more you trust people, the less you will need to talk to them. Extra communication is just for pleasure.

<blockquote class=”twitter-tweet”><p lang=”en” dir=”ltr”>“In any human interaction, the required amount of communication is inversely proportional to the level of trust.” -<a href=”https://twitter.com/bhorowitz?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw”>@bhorowitz</a></p>&mdash; Brandon G. Donnelly (@donnelly_b) <a href=”https://twitter.com/donnelly_b/status/1195202488057679872?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw”>November 15, 2019</a></blockquote> <script async src=”https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js&#8221; charset=”utf-8″></script>

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